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  1.  permalink
    Good selection and prices, staff that usually knows what they are talking about and an excellent return policy. Fry's works for me.
    (Is there ever a way to get store credit for returning opened software? An Inquiring mind who didn't read the rebate requirement wants to know.)
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  3.  permalink
    We don't take back opened software for shit. No store credit, no anything. Not even for a reduced amount. Don't even try.
    •  
      CommentAuthorskullywag
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2010
     permalink
    frysemployee: We don't take back opened software for shit. No store credit, no anything. Not even for a reduced amount. Don't even try.
     
     
    I don't know of ANY store that will refund on software. SOME WILL replace with identical item, if disc is damaged.  
    Good idea is to download a trial before buying any software. About 80% of all software sold have some type of free trial to download, so you can make sure it is compatible with your OS, or works the way advertised.
    •  
      CommentAuthorasdf
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2010 edited
     permalink
    The software industry is broken and they need to design software where it can be returned. When a product is returned it should be deactivated so it can't be used further.  
     
    The software industry can also do Software-as-a-Service, SaaS. SaaS is like a subscription service where you pay monthly fees to keep your software going. For example, Photoshop SaaS pricing can be pay $10 a month for commercial use, or $5 per month for personal use. World of Warcraft players are very familiar with these subscription services as WoW is a Software-as-a-Service application.
  4.  permalink
    Too bad. I thought there might be a secret software return menu...like In-n-Out.
    •  
      CommentAuthorasdf
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2010
     permalink
    maybe you can call the software vendor and get authorization to return it back to the store.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBest Buy
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2010
     permalink
    asdf: maybe you can call the software vendor and get authorization to return it back to the store.
     
    Some vendors allow this. You would need to get an RMA number. The only other way software could be returned is if you can show somehow that an employee made a mistake and caused you to purchase the wrong item.
    •  
      CommentAuthorGuest 2789
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2010
     permalink
    Back when I worked at EA doing tech support, if people needed to return a game to the store, they could mail us the game with a copy of the receipt and we would send them a sealed copy of the game to return to the store. Whether or not they still do this I do not know though. Other software companies may do the same as well.
  5.  permalink
    Just to satisfy my curiosity, I'd like to compare a system build using the 3 vendors mentioned earlier: Amazon, Frys, and Newegg.

    Just a few baselines:
    -- For the parts list I'll go with Renethx's Recommended HTPC systems guide from AVSForum.com. He has a generic build picked out "in case you have no idea what to choose (and no time to dig)." Since I did not pick out the individual parts, it should be a fair sampling of prices for the 3 vendors.
    -- For motherboard I had to substitute the ASUS P7P55D-E PRO, which is listed as an alternate recommendation by Renethx, because Frys does not carry the primary recommendation of ASRock H55M/USB3 and it would be unfair to compare different product selections.
    -- For memory I had to substitute the Corsair 4GB Dual Channel Corsair DDR3 Memory for Intel Core i5 Processors (CMX4GX3M2A1600C9). This alternative was chosen based on Amazon's "What do customers ultimately buy after viewing this item?" feature, listing that 30% buy the Corsair 4gb sticks while 23% buy the originally recommended G.SKill 4gb sticks.
    -- Graphics Card was omitted because I couldn't find it at Frys so we'll just stick with onboard video rather than figuring out an alternative card to go with.
    -- For PSU I had to bump up to the 600w model because that is the lowest version that Frys carries.
    -- For case I had to substitute the Antec ISK 310-150, which is listed as an alternate recommendation by Renethx, because Frys does not carry the primary recommendation of Antec Fusion Remote Black microATX, with LCD/IR receiver/remote
    -- For the purpose of shipping calculations, I will use my home address
    -- For the purpose of tax calculations, I will use my local rates.
    -- For the purpose of gas calculations, I will use the google maps distance between my home address and the physical vendor times 2 (round trip). Gas price will be set at $2.50 (the current average for regular unleaded in my area). MPG will be set at a generous 31mpg, the highway rating for my Accord v6.

    Amazon / Frys / Newegg / Description -- Shipping will be listed as "+ $x.xx" next to the store price

    $113.99 + $0 / $122.99 + 0 / $114.99 + 0 / CPU: Core i3 530 2.93GHz LGA1156
    $0 / $0 / $0 / CPU Cooler: Stock cooler
    $179.99 + $5.49 / $179.99 + $0 / $179.99 + 0 / Motherboard: ASUS P7P55D-E PRO
    $93.99 + $0 / $89.99 + 0 / $93.99 + $0 / Memory: Corsair 4GB Dual Channel Corsair DDR3 Memory for Intel Core i5 Processors (CMX4GX3M2A1600C9)
    $0 / $0 / $0 / Graphics Card (Optional): Omitted
    $47.87 + $0 / $59.99 + $0 / $54.99 + $0 / HDD: Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 500GB ST3500418AS SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM
    $89.99 + $0 / $99.99 + $0 / $80.99 + $0 / PSU: CORSAIR CMPSU-650TX 650W
    $89.99 + $0 / $89.99 + $0 / $79.99 + $9.99 / Case: Antec ISK 310-150

    $0 / $53.04 / $0 / Tax @ 0.825%
    $5.49 / $0 / $9.99 / Shipping subtotal (listed separately for easy reference purposes)
    $0 / $1.94 / $0 / Gas for 24 miles round trip @ $2.50/gal @ 31mpg

    Totals
    Amazon: $615.82 + $0 tax + $5.49 shipping + $0 gas = $621.31
    Frys: $642.94 + $53.04 tax + $0 shipping + $1.94 gas = $697.92
    Newegg: $604.94 + $0 tax + $9.99 shipping + $0 gas = $614.93

    Summary:
    Newegg seems to be the lowest overall vendor, Amazon a close second, and Frys a distant third.
    Frys has similar or higher pricing in all cases except one.
    Frys has limited product selection, requiring multiple substitutions to be made for the purpose of a fair comparison across all 3 vendors.
    From a purchasing perspective, Newegg is the most convenient because of the lower pricing and the time savings of never having to leave your house.
    From a returns perspective, Frys is the most convenient because the gas and time spent driving to the local store is lower than the gas and money spent shipping a product back.

    I have nothing against Fry's new marketing policy. It is their store so they should be able to run it any way they please. I do think, however, that by eliminating the loss-leader items they are no longer competitive as a PC parts vendor. Even if you eliminate the tax difference, they are still priced higher than their competition. Yes I'll miss their cpu+motherboard combos, but as retailers adjust to current market climates so must we as consumers. In this case, I think that means switching to a heavier reliance of online vendors such as Newegg and Amazon.

    I would categorize myself as power user with a decent amount of expendable income. Ten years ago when I had a tighter budget and tons of free time I would hunt down the absolute lowest cost, often times picking up some parts locally and ordering from multiple online vendors to take advantage of these loss-leader sales. These days my time is limited so I might research the best pricing for one or two of the most expensive item and then stick with that vendor for the rest of the parts. By providing that reason for making a couple of high dollar purchases the vendor will also pick up the remaining low dollar purchases. If I were to generalize, I think Frys is losing out on a stable revolving purchase market segment that customers like me represent. I say this all without having their sales numbers to crunch, so we'll never know if their change in direction is actually a good or bad thing for them.
  6.  permalink
    ummm last week frys had the I5 661 for 129? add that in to your equation and u will see frys is the better deal
  7.  permalink
    That may be true -- I only checked this week's Frys paper for current sales -- but the I5 661 wasn't a part I was looking for. I tried to keep the parts list as close to the original recommended parts list as possible, except where the item could not be found by all the vendors being compared.

    With the part adjustment you stated, and using sales pricing from the short term past, the totals would change to:
    Amazon @ $683.30, Newegg @ $699.93. Frys @ $704.92 (ordered least to most expensive).

    I only calculated recent sales prices on the CPU because it would be a lot of work to look up archived pricing on all 3 vendors. I used a sale price of $129.99 for Frys, $175.98 for Amazon, and $199.99 for Newegg. I'd be interested in seeing the results for all the other items if someone else wants to do the leg work. Under the adjusted scenario, Amazon takes the lead with Newegg and Frys neck-and-neck at 2nd and 3rd place. Frys is still not the 'better' deal, although pricing is at least in the competitive ballpark in this case.
  8.  permalink
    I'll probably be putting together a Core i7 system in a month or two. I've been casually looking at prices for a CPU, MOBO and case at the same retailers. Frankly, I'm surprised how competitive Fry's is if you can be flexible on part selection and can put the system together over 2 or 3 weeks. Fry's clearly has the advantage if you wind up returning something. I don't mind the end of combos as they never featured the parts I was interested in. I'll probably mix and match between the three retailers when I start pulling the trigger.
  9.  permalink
    "<I>Just to satisfy my curiosity</I>, I'd like to compare a system build using the 3 vendors mentioned earlier: Amazon, Frys, and Newegg."

    Quit trolling just because you're butt hurt that we don't sell combos anymore. The only people that truly give a shit are the people that use frys as a supplier for their own business. Regular people come in to get those parts maybe once a year. They don't care, most dont even know we had combos.
    •  
      CommentAuthorskullywag
    • CommentTimeSep 27th 2010
     permalink
    Guest: "Just to satisfy my curiosity, I'd like to compare a system build using the 3 vendors mentioned earlier: Amazon, Frys, and Newegg."  
     
    Quit trolling just because you're butt hurt that we don't sell combos anymore. The only people that truly give a shit are the people that use frys as a supplier for their own business. Regular people come in to get those parts maybe once a year. They don't care, most dont even know we had combos.
     
     
    Do you realize how STUPID you sound? Only PC business owners bought the combos, and "regular" people only once a year? And you gleened this tidbit of information, how?  
    WE GET IT. There are folks who work at the store who believed combos were black-death for Frys. And that sales have been skyrocketing since their demise. And that the discussion had nothing to do with commissions. Are you the official speaker of all parts buyers? The Jesse Jackson of computer geeks? Yeah right.  
     
    I originally started this thread asking where the combos went, and obviously made the mistake of saying they were about the only reason I shop at Frys. Thus started the pissing match of commission hunters and customers.  
    I'm of the mind that combos will be back in the not so distant future.....I see they are already dropping the "Too low to show!" from most of their ads. I guess not as many people were thrilled with driving out, or calling to see a price, as they thought.
  10.  permalink
    u mad bro?
    •  
      CommentAuthorskullywag
    • CommentTimeSep 27th 2010
     permalink
    Guest: u mad bro?
     
     
    Not in the least.
  11.  permalink
    U mad.
    •  
      CommentAuthorflea
    • CommentTimeSep 27th 2010
     permalink
    he mad broFry's is corrupt I am here to talk about it.
  12.  permalink
    Not sure who the "u mad bro" question was directed towards, but as the guy who instigated the vendor comparison I can respond with "No." My last HTPC build simply went to a different PC parts vendor. I can't say I've actually been mad about pc price issues since the rambus debacle many years back.

    The troll response was definitely directed at me and all I can say is that it seems like you are taking personal offense to my comments without reason. I found the original topic interesting, decided to do a little research of my own, and posted the results for everyones benefit. Someone gave helpful feedback about sale pricing that I wasn't aware of and I went back to adjust a portion of my results to see what effect it would have. You would be hard pressed to say that I've tried to manipulate anything given my methodical approach and openness to feedback. So how exactly am I trolling now?

    Getting back on topic again, I've purchased around 15-20 cpu+mb combos since I found about the periodic sales. A large amount of the bundled motherboards (maybe up to 80-90%) either directly went into the trash without opening the box or ended up in a stack of unopened motherboards in a closet until they eventually found their way to the trash. The combo sale has always been a means to get cheap CPU's.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAyaHu
    • CommentTimeSep 29th 2010
     permalink
    Hate the game, not the player.Superhero!
  13.  permalink
    Actually the combo deals never really affected me, because I was never able to get in on any of those deals. Why? Well, like someone has mentioned before, the local ebay/computer reseller scavengers always get all of the combos before I can even click on add to cart. Fry's only has a few of those every week to get people to walk in and from my understanding they are usually sold out within minutes of posting.

    I, at one point, strongly suspected that insider employees were buying them online, reserving them and reselling them or had friends that were in on it. Anyway, my point is that the elimination of combo deals will probably only affect the 10 scavengers out there that show up every week and take all the deals that 99.99% of us never even get the chance to buy.

    Don't get me wrong, I'd love to save that extra $60 on the free motherboard combo deal with that nice Core i7, but what good is it to me if I can't even buy it.

    On the other hand, I could also argue that since these deals are sold to so few people every week, that a company at the size of Fry's would not be losing that much money on each of these deals assuming they only have 5-7 in stock per deal (to my knowledge some stores only had 2-3 in stock). In which case, eliminating these deals would only gain back a small portion of overall store profits, so I don't see a point in eliminating a lead for generating foot traffic to save such a small fraction of costs.
  14.  permalink
    I can’t say as I blame Fry’s or the employees.

    If people were buying the combos for themselves to save cost on a system build for themselves then the benefit would be to the store to keep the combo for customer loyalty and the possibility of profit from that customer.

    But it seems there are many who resell these cheap deals which costs Fry’s much more of a loss as these resellers are less likely to make up the losses with profit buys, at least to the magnitude that they buy combos at.

    One guy said he had bought 300+ combos in the last few years, at $100 loss per that’s $30K loss, even at $50 loss that’s $15K. I seriously doubt that guy has purchased enough product to generate $15K profit (which would be roughly $150K in product sales assuming a 10% net profit).

    It makes perfect sense that with these “bottom feeders” gone, they being those who buy at a loss in much greater proportion that the average buyer, that Fry’s sales have increased net profit, at least in the one specific components section that this applies to.

    Likely these “resellers” don’t even have business licenses, don’t declare their profits, and are generally criminals when it comes to it. Sure in tough times you have to find ways to survive, but in this marginal way in which they were doing it, to start crying foul when their goldmine dries up does not evoke my sympathy.

    I consider myself a more typical Fry’s customer. When I have something I need I do some research for price and availability, and based on need I either get it online (if I really don’t need it right away or care about RMA times) or I get it at Fry’s (when I want it right away and/or I want walk-in RMA).

    I also tend to steer clear of “combo deals” because the components are rarely the brands or models I would choose to buy on my own, and when it comes to component quality I don’t pinch pennies.

    To each their own, I guess. I will still buy there for the things they have that I want.
    •  
      CommentAuthorskullywag
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2020
     permalink
    Just thought I'd reply to some old "gems" to bring them to the top of post list, and show how Fry's got to where it is today. Spoiler Alert: It's NOT Amazon.
  15.  permalink
    I think Fry's inability to keep selling dirt cheap CPU/mobo combos had a big factor that they didn't have the volume anymore to offer them because Amazon, NewEgg, etc. took many of their old customers that did system builds. I might add that many if not most of the CPU/mobo combos were with ECS motherboards that were notoriously bad in many cases. After ECS parent company sued Fry's that business relationship went away and with it most of the mobo combos. ECS motherboards were like Airlink networking equipment: pretty low quality.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfrysanon101
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2020 edited
     permalink
    I think the reason why they got to where they are now is that they pissed off enough Vendors by not paying them. Now no vendor (that isn't some Chinese knock-off) wants to have anything to do with Fry's Electronics. I saw this coming a mile away when my store stopped selling Cooler Master products a few years ago.