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      CommentAuthorFrenchyFry
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2013
     permalink
    Since when did Fry's start charging customers a Service Charge for bringing in their product covered under the PSC, should the Tech not find something wrong?  
     
    I recall it use to be called a Performance Guarantee ( PG ) which meant that the contract guaranteed the Performance of the product for the Period of time Purchased. If for any reason the product does not PERFORM the same as the day you purchased it, it will be covered under the service agreement.  
     
    So if a customer brings in their defective product say a DVD player which would skip we'll say while playing movies, the tech plugs it in, and when played on the counter, for a few minutes it works, are they are subject to a Service Charge?  
     
    That doesn't sound right at all... Please someone clarify this...
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      CommentAuthorFrenchyFry
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2013 edited
     permalink
    Example of a ( PG ) Fry's Performance Guarantee Being Sold ( Years Back ) on a Rear Projection 65" Big Screen TV  
     
    Customer: "So does This cover Annual Cleanings like XXX's Warranty does ?"  
     
    BAD Salesperson : " Yes, You can call in once every Year and get a Free Cleaning !" ( TOTAL LIE )  
     
    GOOD Salesperson: " Sir, it does not allow for annual cleanings, as with the huge volume we do it would almost be impossible to service so many units. But what it does Cover is the PERFORMANCE of your TV.  
     
    Now, as time goes by, dust does build up on the glass lenses of the 3 CRT's which Produce the light to create your picture. As the dust builds up it can affect the brightness and some dust may even appear as specs on your screen.  
     
    The best way for you to continue to enjoy your purchase is if at any time you feel your picture may not be performing as it should, ie ( small specks in the picture, or brightness issues ) call us up, and when the Service Technician, local to your area, comes to check it out, the first thing they will do is clean the CRT's and remove all the Dust and Dirt built up on the 3 Lenses. This is most cases, will resolve any Picture issues.  
     
    With our Performance Guarantee, this will insure you and your family, peace of mind and continued High Performance you come to expect for 5 years on your Mitsubishi Big Screen !"  
     
    And the BAD SALESPERSON although selling many warranties which made the Sup happy, never lasted long enough with the company for Service to come by one day and beat the Sh*t out of them for lying and deceiving customers...
  2.  permalink
    I was told that I would be charged a diagnositc fee if nothing was found wrong 1 time. They did that to me and I've been poaching them with returns ever since. I know, I know, its a vicious cycle and everyone get's hurt, consumer, retailer and vendor, but I'll stick it to Randy every chance I get.
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      CommentAuthorFrenchyFry
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2013
     permalink
    Can Someone Upload a Copy of the Current PSC Contract Terms and Conditions? The Fry's .com site won't upload it, although I am sure some Terms vary state by state.  
     
    Then again knowing Fry's Ignores many state laws anyways, it may make no difference to them.
  3.  permalink
    FrenchyFry: Since when did Fry's start charging customers a Service Charge for bringing in their product covered under the PSC, should the Tech not find something wrong?  
    [snip]  
    So if a customer brings in their defective product say a DVD player which would skip we'll say while playing movies, the tech plugs it in, and when played on the counter, for a few minutes it works, are they are subject to a Service Charge?  
     
    That doesn't sound right at all... Please someone clarify this...
    That's always been in the PSC as far as I know. If it's not covered (for computers at least) they have to pay the $60 diagnostic fee. I don't know what the terms are for DVD players because I never sold A/V PSCs but if the tech can't replicate the problem with a known good DVD, It's almost certainly the customer's scratched or dirty DVD.  
     
    The bigger question though is: why would anyone buy an extended warranty on a DVD player? They're $25 at Walmart/Best Buy now ($35 if you want a Sony). It makes no sense to buy a warranty on technology which drops in price so rapidly. Maybe in 1999 when a DVD player was several hundred dollars it made sense but not in the past 10 years.  
     
    And you're right: Fry's thinks they are above the law.  
     
    Also the above applies to computers: today's awesome super duper $1000 gaming rig is next years $500 mid-range model, and the year after that it will be the $299 ad special.
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      CommentAuthorgobo760
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2013 edited
     permalink
    FrenchyFry: Can Someone Upload a Copy of the Current PSC Contract Terms and Conditions? The Fry's .com site won't upload it, although I am sure some Terms vary state by state.  
     
    Then again knowing Fry's Ignores many state laws anyways, it may make no difference to them.
     
     
    We used to have to keep a copy of the PSC agreement under the counter in order to pull it out and show customers the clause, because customers would regularly say, "I DON'T BELIEVE YOU! SHOW ME!". I'd usually have to highlight the section ahead of time because it was always such a pain in the ass to find it while a customer is standing there making a scene. There's essentially a section that's in like 4 point font (just like the rest of the terms) that lists all of the items that the PSC won't cover (and it's actually a pretty long list). The way they essentially break it down is that, anything that's the fault of the customer, will not be covered by the PSC. So if your computer hardware is fine but you've been downloading a ton of torrents or don't have any antivirus software installed or whatever, and you got 5 virus's, then that won't be covered. Same goes for any other thing on the PSC under the list of non-covered items. Some of the things on the list that aren't covered are actually things that I think SHOULD be covered, but they're not simply because the PSC states ahead of time that those are things it doesn't cover. For example, the PSC states that "Laptop Hinges" are one of the items that's not covered. Why? Because you are opening and closing the lid of your computer, which wears the hinges down and causes them to break, therefore, you are the one at fault. Silly? Sure. Legal? Yeah, because you read the contract (or didn't read the contract, which is the case 99% of the time) and signed the terms.  
     
    The reason service charges a fee is because Fry's won't reimburse the department for their labor if nothing is wrong with the machine. So the department has to pass the charge for the technicians time directly to the customer, as it states in the service contract. The reason that so many things aren't covered in the PSC is actually pretty simple... if everything was covered, then the PSC would be so expensive that no sane person would ever buy one. The only reason they're as cheap as they are is because all the most likely reasons for why you might bring an item in for repair (user error and physical damage primarily), aren't covered. If you want to see the terms, you can go in to any fry's service department and ask them to make you a copy. When I worked there, they always kept the terms on that "Company Documents" type webpage that kept all the different documents that the various departments might need. Pretty much anyone in any department can access it from any computer in the store, so that would be cool if someone would be willing to download it on one of the stations and then email it to themselves and post it.
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      CommentAuthorgoletadude
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2013
     permalink
    Guest: I was told that I would be charged a diagnositc fee if nothing was found wrong 1 time. They did that to me and I've been poaching them with returns ever since. I know, I know, its a vicious cycle and everyone get's hurt, consumer, retailer and vendor, but I'll stick it to Randy every chance I get.
     
     
    Well why do you keep buying from Fry's? You'll keep poaching them with returns by doing this. I suggest you get what you need from Fry's somewhere else.
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      CommentAuthorFrenchyFry
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013
     permalink
    I was only using a DVD player as an example of an item, or any item for that matter that may take an hour or two to get up to running speed heat wise when a problem may occur, and not so likely during the first few minutes of testing. I know DVDs can scratch, etc. It was only an example.
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      CommentAuthorGuest 9606
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013
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    There are a list of items not covered under Section 10 in the contract (when someone is able to scan or upload it). For items that have no defects "No Trouble Found" there is a clause at the beginning of the contract that says "Benefits of this Contracts" and explains that you can exercise your contract in the case the item has a manufacturer defect.

    If you are exercising your contract when the issue is not covered, it is then deemed non-warranty. The PSC wont explain any costs of diagnostics fee but the PSC only needs to say what is and isn't covered; during the check-on on the Service Request sheet they have you initial Section 6 that tells you a diagnostic fee will be do if it's non-warranty; the diagnostic cost will be right above estimated cost on the first page.

    So far as I know,
    most contracts I have come across do not have a "everything is covered"; I think it's really sleazy when customers believe that EVERYTHING is covered because a lot of the customers I have spoken to intentionally cause these problems (abuse) in order to exercise their contract in hopes of gaining free training support, upgrades, and replacements. I know there are good people out there but the many bad ones ruined it for everybody.

    One of the most common issues I see with computers checked in are software. Even if the technician's go above and beyond explaining that software is not covered the customers insist on checking it in. It isn't always trivial to determine software or hardware issues by merely looking at the computer with your eyes; a thorough diagnostic will allow us to make a professional opinion. I am highly disappointed when customers act like the technician's "tricked" them into checking it in or didn't tell them what was or wasn't covered. At my store, we'll even help you get the manufacturer's phone number so that they can support you on your software problems or suggest that a restore may resolve the more complicated software issues (ie. virus or registry).

    For other products such as the players and sound systems (typically two year contracts) they are normally an instant exchange and no work has to be done by the technician; you'll never have to worry about the non-warranty diagnostic fee for those products because no diagnostic is necessary.
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      CommentAuthorObiWan
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2013
     permalink
    Guest: I think it's really sleazy when customers believe that EVERYTHING is covered because a lot of the customers I have spoken to intentionally cause these problems (abuse) in order to exercise their contract in hopes of gaining free training support, upgrades, and replacements.
     
     
     
    It's been documented here (and elsewhere) that Fry's sales associates will often "stretch the truth" in order to sell a PSC. So...it's not always the "sleazy" customers. Sometimes, they've been mislead. Not all the time (yes, there are those that will purposely damage something just to get a replacement or newer model), but sometimes they're mislead.
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      CommentAuthorgobo760
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2013 edited
     permalink
    ObiWan: It's been documented here (and elsewhere) that Fry's sales associates will often "stretch the truth" in order to sell a PSC. So...it's not always the "sleazy" customers. Sometimes, they've been mislead. Not all the time (yes, there are those that will purposely damage something just to get a replacement or newer model), but sometimes they're mislead.
    Don't forget that Fry's also has pretty much zero-PSC training for it's sales people (I mean supposedly we do, but I've heard our "PSC training" covers everything from reality tv shows to everyones feelings about salt water taffy, and only a few minutes are dedicated to actually learning about the PSC).  
     
    When I worked in service, we would regularly have computer sales guys come up to us all angry saying, "hey why did you tell my customer that the PSC doesn't cover their virus infection???" and it's like "dude, you've been working here what, 2 years now? Have you ever bothered to read the PSC terms since you're selling it to people?" I've found that most salesman don't really know what exactly is in the PSC. Granted, it's a long, tedious read, often in legal-speak, and obviously written by a company lawyer for the explicit purpose of winning a suit in court if someone were to claim that we didn't deliver exactly what we said we would deliver in the contract.
  4.  permalink
    PSC is exactly what it says it is, a "Performance Service Contract", not a warranty. Pushing a $29 PSC on a $99 camera is a tough sell, but many folks will still buy it if you paint an accurate picture and explain all the benefits. Tell the customer WHY they should consider the PSC, especially if they are looking at something that you KNOW is a pos and will probably fail as soon as the factory warranty is up, which is usually in 90 days. Management also tends to turn a blind eye if you push the PSC "creatively", as long as your numbers are good and you have a high Monster attach.
  5.  permalink
    Also, if you wait until you are writing up their quote to ask if they want PSC, you are indeed a loser, a reject, and should not be in sales at FRYS.