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      CommentAuthorDrLexus
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2017
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    Just wanted to throw out my two cents if you're currently thinking of leaving your job at Frys, but aren't sure where to go from there. If you're technically inclined, I recommend aiming for IT security. Here's a basic road map of how you can get there without dropping a ton of cash on a university education or on questionable and expensive IT training courses.  
     
    1) If you have no computer experience at all, start with the CompTIA A+ certification. It's two exams at about $180/each, which cover the basics of computers, hardware, and troubleshooting. Make a four month or six month plan, buy a couple study guides on Amazon or use free online study resources (there are a ton for A+), and study a little each day. You should be able to get through each exam in two-three months, and that's with a relaxed study pace. You can go even faster if you have a lot of free time. Once you have an A+, start looking for entry level computer tech jobs, IT help desk jobs, or anything with an MSP (managed service provider). Working for an MSP usually sucks, but you'll get a lot of experience really fast.  
     
    2) Get your networking background. CompTIA has a Network+ certification, and you can go that route if you want, but I recommend skipping it and studying for Cisco's CCNA. CCNA is more in-depth than Network+, and it also has vendor-specific knowledge (Cisco gear). A CCNA is worth something on a resume. Same idea here as before...make a study plan, stick to it. CCNA is two exams at about $150/each. They can be quite challenging, but CCNA is popular enough that there is a ton of free/cheap study material out there for it. After you get your CCNA, you should start looking for entry level positions in NOCs (Network operation centers), data centers, or basically anywhere that will give you more responsibility. Try to get out of the MSP environment at this point.  
     
    3) Start working on building a foundation in security topics. CompTIA Security+ is a good starting point, and is also a requirement for many DoD jobs. It's a single $300 test, and there is plenty of study material out there for it. Once you get this, you can start looking for entry-level security jobs. This can be a difficult barrier to cross, so be patient, keep learning, and keep looking for jobs that offer you the best learning experiences.  
     
    Other things to learn as you go:  
     
    1) If you don't know Linux, start learning Linux and gaining some familiarity. There is a CompTIA Linux+ cert, but it's probably not worth the cash to actually get it. Instead just learn the topics and get yourself comfortable in the environment. The Linux+ study guides aren't expensive, and you're under no obligation to ever take the exams.  
     
    2) It's good to have some basic familiarity with programming and coding. Python is a great language to start with, and there are plenty of free resources to help you learn it, such as codeacademy.com.  
     
    IT is always growing, and security is only going to become more in-demand as we move into the IoT(Internet of Things). It may turn out security isn't for you, but there are still lots of great options in IT such as networking, system administration, and even project management. I wouldn't say making IT a career is easy, but most any field will have its challenges. The big advantage with IT is, dollar-for-dollar, it's probably the cheapest field to get into that can actually pay decent. You don't need a degree, you don't need to spend a ton of money on training, you just need to be motivated.  
     
    Cheers.
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      CommentAuthorCharlie
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2017
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    Good post. Can a mod sticky this?
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      CommentAuthorObiWan
    • CommentTimeFeb 21st 2017
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    Somehow....a "career at Fry's" sounds like an oxymoron
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      CommentAuthorGuest 2780
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2017
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    Great post DrLexus, those are excellent building blocks to leave this environment. It also helps to follow your friends, staying in touch with old coworkers can lead to unexpected job opportunities.
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      CommentAuthorCharlie
    • CommentTimeMar 3rd 2017
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    Or... you bums can finally organize a labor union and Make Fry's A Great Place To Work Again.
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      CommentAuthorJessrond
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2017
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    You guys should go around trying to start shxt with blonde girls because your Lord and Master master William Randolph Fry hates Polish people and 95% of you were shipped over from Tibet.  
    :face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-devil-grin::face-devil-grin::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey::face-monkey:

    3d3f1b460-f67b-470a-9f04-c69cd1e4d505.jpg
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